Archive for the 'shameless self-promotion' Category

My answer to the Edge Annual Question 2010: How is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?

At the end of every year editors at my favorite website The Edge ask intellectuals to answer a thought-provoking question. This year it was “How is the internet changing the way you think?” My answer is posted here:
http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_15.html#stodden

My Interview with ITConversations on Reproducible Research

On September 30, I was interviewed by Jon Udell from ITConversations.org in his Interviews with Innovators series, on Reproducibility of Computational Science.

Here’s the blurb: “If you’re a writer, a musician, or an artist, you can use Creative Commons licenses to share your digital works. But how can scientists license their work for sharing? In this conversation, Victoria Stodden — a fellow with Science Commons — explains to host Jon Udell why scientific output is different and how Science Commons aims to help scientists share it freely.”

Legal Barriers to Open Science: my SciFoo talk

I had an amazing time participating at Science Foo Camp this year. This is a unique conference: there are 200 invitees comprising some of the most innovative thinkers about science today. Most are scientists but not all – there are publishers, science reporters, scientific entrepreneurs, writers on science, and so on. I met old friends there and found many amazing new ones.

One thing that I was glad to see was the level of interest in Open Science. Some of the top thinkers in this area were there and I’d guess at least half the participants are highly motivated by this problem. There were sessions on reporting negative results, the future of the scientific method, reproducibility in science. I organized a session with Michael Nielsen on overcoming barriers in open science. I spoke about the legal barriers and O’Reilly Media has made the talk available here.

I have papers forthcoming on this topic you can find on my website.

A2K3 Kaltura Award

I am honored and humbled to win the A2K3 Kaltura prize for best paper. Peter Suber posts about it here and gives the abstract. His post also includes a link to a draft of the paper, which can also be found here: Enabling Reproducible Research: Open Licensing For Scientific Innovation. I’d love comments and feedback although please be aware that since the paper is forthcoming in the International Journal of Communications Law and Policy it will very likely undergo changes. Thank you to Kaltura.com and the entire A2K3 committee. I’m very happy to be here in Geneva and enjoying every minute. 🙂