Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Ars technica article on reproducibility in science

John Timmer wrote an excellent article called “Keeping computers from ending science’s reproducibility.” I’m quoted in it. Here’s an excellent follow up blog post by Grant Jacobs, “Reproducible Research and computational biology.”

Advertisements

Post 3: The OSTP’s call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf. The first wave, comments posted here, asked for feedback on implementation issues. The second wave requested input on Features and Technology (our post is here). For the third and final wave on Management, Chris Wiggins, Matt Knepley, and I posted the following comments:

Q1: Compliance. What features does a public access policy need to ensure compliance? Should this vary across agencies?

One size does not fit all research problems across all research communities, and a heavy-handed general release requirement across agencies could result in de jure compliance – release of data and code as per the letter of the law – without the extra effort necessary to create usable data and code facilitating reproducibility (and extension) of the results. One solution to this barrier would be to require grant applicants to formulate plans for release of the code and data generated through their research proposal, if funded. This creates a natural mechanism by which grantees (and peer reviewers), who best know their own research environments and community norms, contribute complete strategies for release. This would allow federal funding agencies to gather data on needs for release (repositories, further support, etc.); understand which research problem characteristics engender which particular solutions, which solutions are most appropriate in which settings, and uncover as-yet unrecognized problems particular researchers may encounter. These data would permit federal funding agencies to craft release requirements that are more sensitive to barriers researchers face and the demands of their particular research problems, and implement strategies for enforcement of these requirements. This approach also permits researchers to address confidentiality and privacy issues associated with their research.

Examples:

One exemplary precedent by a UK funding agency is the January 2007 “Policy on data management and sharing”
(http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/Policy/Policy-and-position-statements/WTX035043.htm)
adopted by The Wellcome Trust (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/index.htm) according to which “the Trust will require that the applicants provide a data management and sharing plan as part of their application; and review these data management and sharing plans, including any costs involved in delivering them, as an integral part of the funding decision.” A comparable policy statement by US agencies would be quite useful in clarifying OSTP’s intent regarding the relationship between publicly-supported research and public access to the research products generated by this support.

Continue reading ‘Post 3: The OSTP’s call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government’

The OSTP's call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf:

Open access to our body of federally funded research, including not only published papers but also any supporting data and code, is imperative, not just for scientific progress but for the integrity of the research itself. We list below nine focus areas and recommendations for action.

Continue reading ‘The OSTP's call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government’

The Climate Modeling Leak: Code and Data Generating Published Results Must be Open and Facilitate Reproducibility

On November 20 documents including email and code spanning more than a decade were leaked from the Computing Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at East Anglia University in the UK.

The Leak Reveals a Failure of Reproducibility of Computational Results

It appears as though the leak came about through a long battle to get the CRU scientists to reveal the code and data associated with published results, and highlights a crack in the scientific method as practiced in computational science. Publishing standards have not yet adapted to the relatively new computational methods used pervasively across scientific research today.

Other branches of science have long-established methods to bring reproducibility into their practice. Deductive or mathematical results are published only with proofs, and there are long established standards for an acceptable proof. Empirical science contains clear mechanisms for communication of methods with the goal of facilitation of replication. Computational methods are a relatively new addition to a scientist’s toolkit, and the scientific community is only just establishing similar standards for verification and reproducibility in this new context. Peer review and journal publishing have generally not yet adapted to the use of computational methods and still operate as suitable for the deductive or empirical branches, creating a growing credibility gap in computational science.

The key point emerging from the leak of the CRU docs is that without the code and data it is all but impossible to tell whether the research is right or wrong, and this community’s lack of awareness of reproducibility and blustery demeanor does not inspire confidence in their production of reliable knowledge. This leak and the ensuing embarrassment would not have happened if code and data that permit reproducibility had been released alongside the published results. When mature, computational science will produce routinely verifiable results.

Verifying Computational Results without Clear Communication of the Steps Taken is Near-Impossible

The frequent near-impossibility of verification of computational results when reproducibility is not considered a research goal is shown by the miserable travails of “Harry,” a CRU employee with access to their system who was trying to reproduce the temperature results. The leaked documents contain logs of his unsuccessful attempts. It seems reasonable to conclude that CRU’s published results aren’t reproducible if Harry, an insider, was unable to do so after four years.

This example also illustrates why a decision to leave reproducibility to others, beyond a cursory description of methods in the published text, is wholly inadequate for computational science. Harry seems to have had access to the data and code used and he couldn’t replicate the results. The merging and preprocessing of data in preparation for modeling and estimation encompasses a potentially very large number of steps, and a change in any one could produce different results. Just as when fitting models or running simulations, parameter settings and function invocation sequences must be communicated, again because the final results are a culmination of many decisions and without this information each small step must match the original work – a Herculean task. Responding with raw data when questioned about computational results is merely a canard, not intended to seriously facilitate reproducibility.

The story of Penn State professor of meteorology Michael Mann‘s famous hockey stick temperature time series estimates is an example where lack of verifiability had important consequences. In February 2005 two panels examined the integrity of his work and debunked the results, largely from work done by Peter Bloomfield, a statistics professor at North Carolina State University, and Ed Wegman, statistics professor at George Mason University. (See also this site for further explanation of statistical errors.) Release of the code and data used to generate the results in the hockey stick paper likely would have caught the errors earlier, avoided the convening of the panels to assess the papers, and prevented the widespread promulgation of incorrect science. The hockey stick is a dramatic illustration of global warming and became something of a logo for the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC). Mann was an author of the 2001 IPCC Assessment report, and was a lead author on the “Copenhagen Diagnosis,” a report released Nov 24 and intended to synthesize the hundreds of research papers about human-induced climate change that have been published since the last assessment by the IPCC two years ago. The report was prepared in advance of the Copenhagen climate summit scheduled for Dec 7-18. Emails between CRU researchers and Mann are included in the leak, which happened right before the release of the Copenhagen Diagnosis (a quick search of the leaked emails for “Mann” provided 489 matches).

These reports are important in part because of their impact on policy, as CBS news reports, “In global warming circles, the CRU wields outsize influence: it claims the world’s largest temperature data set, and its work and mathematical models were incorporated into the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 2007 report. That report, in turn, is what the Environmental Protection Agency acknowledged it “relies on most heavily” when concluding that carbon dioxide emissions endanger public health and should be regulated.”

Discussions of Appropriate Level of Code and Data Disclosure on RealClimate.org, Before and After the CRU Leak

For years researchers had requested the data and programs used to produce Mann’s Hockey Stick result, and were resisted. The repeated requests for code and data culminated in Freedom of Information (FOI) requests, in particular those made by Willis Eschenbach, who tells his story of requests he made for underlying code and data up until the time of the leak. It appears that a file, FOI2009.zip, was placed on CRU’s FTP server and then comments alerting people to its existence were posted on several key blogs.

The thinking regarding disclosure of code and data in one part of the climate change community is illustrated in this fascinating discussion on the blog RealClimate.org in February. (Thank you to Michael Nielsen for the pointer.) RealClimate.org has 5 primary authors, one of whom is Michael Mann, and its primary author is Gavin Schmidt who was described earlier this year as a “computer jockeys for Nasa’s James Hansen, the world’s loudest climate alarmist.” In this RealClimate blog post from November 27, Where’s the Data, the position seems to be now very much all in favor of data release, but the first comment asks for the steps taken in reconstructing the results as well. This is right – reproducibility of results should be the concern but does not yet appear to be taken seriously (as also argued here).

Policy and Public Relations

The Hill‘s Blog Briefing Room reported that Senator Inhofe (R-Okla.) will investigate whether the IPCC “cooked the science to make this thing look as if the science was settled, when all the time of course we knew it was not.” With the current emphasis on evidence-based policy making, Inhofe’s review should recommend code and data release and require reliance on verified scientific results in policy making. The Federal Research Public Access Act should be modified to include reproducibility in publicly funded research.

A dangerous ramification from the leak could be an undermining of public confidence in science and the conduct of scientists. My sense is that had this climate modeling community made its code and data readily available in a way that facilitated reproducibility of results, not only would they have avoided this embarrassment but the discourse would have been about scientific methods and results rather than potential evasions of FOIA requests, whether or not data were fudged, or scientists acted improperly in squelching dissent or manipulating journal editorial boards. Perhaps data release is becoming an accepted norm, but code release for reproducibility must follow. The issue here is verification and reproducibility, without which it is all but impossible to tell whether the core science done at CRU was correct or not, even for peer reviewing scientists.

Science 2.0: How Tools are Changing Computational Scientific Research

Technology has a history of sweeping scientific enterprise: from Vannevar Bush’s first analog PDE calculators at MIT in the 30’s through the differential analyzers of the 50’s and 60’s to today’s unfinished transition that will end with computation as absolutely central to scientific enterprise. Now computational tools play not only the traditional role of helping scientific discovery, but of facilitating it. On July 26 I’ll be talking about changes to the scientific method that computation has brought — does reproducibility matter? is computation creating a third branch of the scientific method? — at Science 2.0 in Toronto. The conference focuses on how the Internet is changing the process of doing science: how we share code and data, and how we use new communication technologies for collaboration and work tracking. Here’s the abstract for my talk and the URL:

How Computational Science is Changing the Scientific Method

As computation becomes more pervasive in scientific research, it seems to have become a mode of discovery in itself, a “third branch” of the scientific method. Greater computation also facilitates transparency in research through the unprecedented ease of communication of the associated code and data, but typically code and data are not made available and we are missing a crucial opportunity to control for error, the central motivation of the scientific method, through reproducibility. In this talk I explore these two changes to the scientific method and present possible ways to bring reproducibility into today’ scientific endeavor. I propose a licensing structure for all components of the research, called the “Reproducible Research Standard”, to align intellectual property law with longstanding communitarian scientific norms and encourage greater error control and verifiability in computational science.

http://softwarecarpentry.wordpress.com/guests/

Archives

Do not edit this page

About

I’m a Postdoctoral Associate in Law and Kauffman Fellow in Law and Innovation at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. My website is http://www.stodden.net.

My research focus is changes to the scientific method arising from the pervasiveness of computation, specifically reproducibility in computational science.

The banner photograph is Istanbul at sunrise, and was taken by Sami Ben Gharbia.